Monthly Archives: August 2018

Blatna, Czech Republic – August 2018

Gazing out at the view of the pond Desolate (Rybník Pustá) from my window, one would think I’d feel melancholy. It did make me long for a past when I visited the Czech Republic as a child – back then there were less people, zero commercialism and the quiet peacefulness that comes with feeling safe with ones family. I felt some of that here in the Czech town of Blatna, a small town in Southern Bohemia about an hour and a half drive from Prague.

I found a two week stay in Blatna very pleasant. It took me a few days to adjust to the slower pace, and where I stayed helped. The Penzion u Rybníka Pustý (Penzion at Pond Desolate) is a bed and breakfast run by the family Sheinherr. A spacious and immaculately clean three story house with Bohemian architectural touches and views of the water and charming neighboring Czech homes.

Hana will make you tea, coffee or cappuccino as you sit down to the generous breakfast buffet that is offered daily at a modest additional charge. It includes fresh rolls and Czech pastries that Hana picks up each morning from the local bakery, and a selection of sliced ham, cheeses, honey and jams, a plate of sliced cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers, bowls of assorted fruits including ripe plums when in season, cereals and yogurt. While I sip my tea Hana gently asks if I would like a fried egg that day which she will make for you while you wait. There is also lovely outdoor seating.

Well fed you are ready to plan out your day. While it is easy to get bus connections to Prague, and I did so several times, it is a two hour journey each way so exploring in Blatna in between trips to Prague is the perfect way to relax and recover.

Blatna Castle

The must see attraction in town is Blatna Castle, along with the adjacent grounds which are a combination forest and deer garden.

Admissions is free – the baroness who lives in the centuries old castle asks only that you not walk on the grass, and to make sure to shut the wooden gate to the park behind you as you enter or leave the grounds, so that the deer that roam freely don’t escape.

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